Solid State Hard Disk

Solid state storage (SSS) is a method of data storage accomplished by using  Solid State Hard Disk integrated circuit devices to store data rather than moving magnetic or optical media. SSS is typically non-volatile and may take various forms, such as a solid state drive, solid state card or solid state module. In addition, SSS includes PATA (legacy), SATA, SAS, Fibre Channel or PCIe interface options.Solid state drives (SSD) used in the enterprise are data storage devices that use non-moving flash memory technology rather than rotating magnetic disks or optical media. SSDs are compatible with traditional hard drive interfaces, such as SATA or SAS, and have a familiar hard drive form factor, such as 3.5-, 2.5- or 1.8-inch.Both USB flash drives and SSDs use NAND flash memory. However, it’s the quality of NAND used—as well as the controller and interface involved—that separates a simple USB flash drive from an enterprise-class storage device, like those found in blade servers and external storage systems. Today’s SSDs are different from hard drives when it comes to data storage.SSDs are sophisticated storage devices that use non-moving memory chips, mostly non-volatile NAND flash, instead of the rotating magnetic disks found in hard drives. Hard drives can take the data directly from the host and write it to the rotating media. In contrast, SSDs can’t write a single bit of information without first erasing and then rewriting very large blocks of data at one time (also referred to as P/E).Because SSDs and hard drives have different strengths in terms of efficiency, they complement each other and can co-exist. SSDs deliver ultra-fast random data access (inputs-outputs per second, or IOPS, performance), low power consumption, small size and high physical resilience (due to no moving parts)—but they cost more. Hard drives provide fast sequential data access with high capacity, endurance and reliability at a much lower price.  A process known as Wear-leveling is used by an SSD controller to maximize the life of the flash memory. This technique levels the wear across all blocks by distributing data writes across the flash memory devices.   Solid state hard drives (SSDs) store data through the use of semi-conductors. Though they can cost substantially more than your traditional magnetic hard drive, they offer a few advantages: Lower Power Consumption – SSDs consume less power because they have no moving parts. This attribute makes them less susceptible to physical shock and latency. Faster Data Access – In normal situations, data is written and read from random locations on the disk. The lack of moving parts in SSDs cuts down on random read and write latency functions. Increased Reliability – While the point can be argued, the lack of moving components makes SSDs less susceptible to head crash. They store, read and write information slightly differently than magnetic hard drives. For this reason, they are less susceptible to the problems magnetic hardware experience. SOLID STATE HARD DISK DRIVE (SSD) What are the challenges facing SSD? There are three primary concerns impacting SSD adoption in the enterprise:  Endurance and reliability, a lack of industry standards, and high cost.   Endurance/Reliability Concerns 

1 2 3 32